Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Chalisa Moves to Lewa

Apr 14, 2017 | Categories: Community, Lions, Research, Reserves | Leave A Comment »

Chalisa in Buffalo Springs in 2013

We are thrilled to report that a young male lion who we last saw in Buffalo Springs National Reserve in November 2013, has been sighted in Lewa Wildlife Conservancy.  The Lewa lion research team led by Mary Mwololo alerted us that a new male had appeared in Lewa in January and sent us photos. We looked through our lion database and through whisker spot identification, we confirmed that the male in Lewa was indeed Chalisa - the Buffalo Springs male.

Since he was found in Lewa, Chalisa has been collared as part of a wider dispersal study (with Lion Landscapes) across the landscape.  We are keeping a close eye on him and grateful to work with our partners in Lewa, Lion Landscapes, and the local communities, to ensure continued mov...

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Lion Scouts Capture Data on Lions and Livestock

Jan 27, 2017 | Categories: Research, Staff | Leave A Comment »

Every day, our Ewaso Lions Scouts put on their uniforms and head into the bush on patrol. The three Scouts bring an important research element to our conservation work. By collecting baseline data and monitoring long term lion and wildlife population trends, we can measure the progress of our work and design new activities that ultimately promote lion conservation.

Scouts are trained on all aspects of wildlife conservation including conflict mitigation, carnivore ecology, the importance of carnivores, GPS tracking and more. Scouts monitor lion and wildlife movement, gather data on abundance and distribution, and serve as wildlife ambassadors by spreading the conservation message to their communities.

Meet the Scouts The Ewaso Lio...

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Exploring New Areas for Lion Connectivity

Oct 1, 2016 | Categories: Lions, Research | 2 Comments

During our exploration of Namunyak, we came across this incredible sighting of a group of nearly 60 reticulated giraffe.

Lions and other large carnivores are wide-ranging species, which means protected areas are often too small to maintain viable populations. Successful conservation of these species, and their prey, instead requires a landscape scale approach.

Therefore, as we are busy working on our strategic plan for the next three years, one important question we must address is: Which areas should we target to ensure lions can survive and move safely between community areas where they are able to find safe refuges?

To answer this question we need to think beyond the boundaries of our current study areas; we need to explore the surrounding landscape for ourselves and talk to the communities and stakeholders who live and work there.

This month,...

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Read Our 2015 Annual Report

Jun 30, 2016 | Categories: Camp Life, Community, Donors, Education, Lions, Research, Reserves, Staff, Training, Warriors | Leave A Comment »

The cover shows a striking image of Lguret, the dominant male lion in our Samburu study area.

Our 2015 Annual Report has just been released and is available to download as a PDF. It contains highlights from 2015 in terms of conservation impact, operational growth, and important results that we were able to deliver thanks to your support.

The report was designed to give you a clear understanding of our work and our impact, with beautiful layouts and images. The report covers:

How we transform human-lion conflict; Our community conservation programs like Lion Kids Camp and Mama Simba; Using research and science to monitor lions and measure their survival across the landscape; 2015 highlights; And more.

We hope you enjoy it. Please share your feedback - we love hearing from you. Download the 2015 Annual Report here ...

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New Paper Published by Ewaso Lions’ Alayne Oriol Cotterill

Mar 12, 2015 | Categories: Research, Staff | 1 Comment

Dr. Alayne Cotterill, Ewaso Lions Research Director and author of the new paper, tracks lions equipped with VHF collars in Laikipia, Kenya.

We are pleased to announce that Alayne – our Research Director – has a published article on lion spatial use in human dominated landscapes. The article appears in the peer-reviewed journal Animal Behaviour.

This work uses GPS technology so see how lions change their movements and activities around people. The results show that where human and livestock densities are relatively low, lions are able to use human occupied areas by adjusting their activities temporally to avoid being detected by people. That is, lions are more likely to be active near people when people are most likely to be asleep. When people are active, lions move away or hide. In this way, lions are able to use resources in human-occupied areas without being detected....

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