Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Lions Move Through a Challenging Landscape

Jul 31, 2017 | Categories: Lions, Research | 3 Comments

Lguret, captured on our camera trap, in June

Since the arrival of the 4 new males in April, we have seen a marked change in the movement patterns of Loeku and Lguret.

Fortunately, Loeku – the four-year old son of Nashipai - was collared in February and, as a result, we have been able to closely monitor his movements through daily collar downloads. This data showed how Loeku moved out of Buffalo Springs, where he had been resident for a while, and headed south to Isiolo town.  Unfortunately, he then became stuck inside a farm and was forced to move back towards Buffalo Springs and the community conservancies south of here. Eventually, Loeku moved around the big hills and headed to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy. However, his time here was also short-lived; after just 48 hours he heade...

Read More..

Shivani Receives PhD From University of Oxford

Jul 31, 2017 | Categories: Education, Lions, Research | 20 Comments

Shivani graduates at Oxford in July

We are very excited to announce that Founder & Executive Director of Ewaso Lions, Shivani Bhalla, received her PhD from the University of Oxford in July.

"This has been a long journey and I am very relieved to have finally completed my PhD (known as a DPhil at Oxford). This was only possible thanks to the enormous support I received from my family, friends and the Ewaso Lions team who gave me so much strength, space and time to finally wrap it up.  My thesis focuses on lions in community areas and what they need in order to survive with people.  The findings of my thesis have already helped lions in Samburu and will continue to do so.  I dedicated it to Jeremy Lucas, who passed away a year ago and loved Samburu, its lions and peop...

Read More..

Chalisa Moves to Lewa

Apr 14, 2017 | Categories: Community, Lions, Research, Reserves | Leave A Comment »

Chalisa in Buffalo Springs in 2013

We are thrilled to report that a young male lion who we last saw in Buffalo Springs National Reserve in November 2013, has been sighted in Lewa Wildlife Conservancy.  The Lewa lion research team led by Mary Mwololo alerted us that a new male had appeared in Lewa in January and sent us photos. We looked through our lion database and through whisker spot identification, we confirmed that the male in Lewa was indeed Chalisa - the Buffalo Springs male.

Since he was found in Lewa, Chalisa has been collared as part of a wider dispersal study (with Lion Landscapes) across the landscape.  We are keeping a close eye on him and grateful to work with our partners in Lewa, Lion Landscapes, and the local communities, to ensure continued mov...

Read More..

Lion Scouts Capture Data on Lions and Livestock

Jan 27, 2017 | Categories: Research, Staff | Leave A Comment »

Every day, our Ewaso Lions Scouts put on their uniforms and head into the bush on patrol. The three Scouts bring an important research element to our conservation work. By collecting baseline data and monitoring long term lion and wildlife population trends, we can measure the progress of our work and design new activities that ultimately promote lion conservation.

Scouts are trained on all aspects of wildlife conservation including conflict mitigation, carnivore ecology, the importance of carnivores, GPS tracking and more. Scouts monitor lion and wildlife movement, gather data on abundance and distribution, and serve as wildlife ambassadors by spreading the conservation message to their communities.

Meet the Scouts The Ewaso Lio...

Read More..

Exploring New Areas for Lion Connectivity

Oct 1, 2016 | Categories: Lions, Research | 2 Comments

During our exploration of Namunyak, we came across this incredible sighting of a group of nearly 60 reticulated giraffe.

Lions and other large carnivores are wide-ranging species, which means protected areas are often too small to maintain viable populations. Successful conservation of these species, and their prey, instead requires a landscape scale approach.

Therefore, as we are busy working on our strategic plan for the next three years, one important question we must address is: Which areas should we target to ensure lions can survive and move safely between community areas where they are able to find safe refuges?

To answer this question we need to think beyond the boundaries of our current study areas; we need to explore the surrounding landscape for ourselves and talk to the communities and stakeholders who live and work there.

This month,...

Read More..