Video: The Ewaso Nyiro River Flows Again

Mar 27, 2015 | Categories: Other news, Reserves | Leave A Comment »

The Ewaso Nyiro River dried up completely in February here in Samburu. Some stretches near Westgate still had a few pools of water but by the end of February, these were totally dry. We saw elephants and other wildlife dig for water but as the dry spell continued, the water levels were so low, that water was harder to come by.

Ewaso Lions, together with Warriors from Warrior Watch, ladies from Mama Simba, partnered with Westgate Conservancy rangers and dug 6 large waterholes in the dry river. Over the following days, we saw numerous wildlife species drink from the holes.

On the 22nd of March, we finally saw rain in the distance and even got a few drops.  But the river did not flow.

Finally, on the 23rd of March, our Lion Scout, Fr...

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The First Rains Arrive and Break the Dry Spell in Samburu

Mar 27, 2015 | Categories: Camp Life, Other news | Leave A Comment »

Happy elephants, wet from the rain.

We just had three incredibly challenging days in the field. Our team of warriors (Marco, Yesalai, Lesiamito, Lekoyo and Letoiye) and I were heading back to camp, exhausted, grubby, and overwhelmed. The winds were strong and there was dust blowing everywhere.

As we were driving, we suddenly smelled rain – that unmistakably rich, earthy smell – in the distance. All of us stuck our heads out of the car, sniffing the air with big smiles on our faces.  Marco told me it was exactly what the cows do when they smell the first rains: stick their noses up towards the smell of the rain.

Suddenly, the first rain drops arrived and there was loud cheering in the car as the warriors recited “Ngai! Ngai!” (“God” in the Samburu langua...

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Digging Water Holes for Wildlife and People During The Drought

Mar 23, 2015 | Categories: Community, Other news, Westgate Conservancy | Leave A Comment »

Ewaso Lions staff and community members dig side-by-side to create water holes for people and wildlife in Samburu.

The Ewaso Nyiro river is one of the only permanent sources of freshwater in the region. It acts as a vital lifeline both for wildlife and the local people and their livestock. Yet, with no significant rainfall here in several months the river is empty and landscape is getting drier and dustier with each passing day.

Whilst carnivores tend to thrive during the dry season, it can be a challenging time for other species. This month, Ewaso Lions gathered together an enthusiastic team of “diggers”, including Ewaso Lions staff, members of our Warrior Watch and Mama Simba programmes, and several Westgate Conservancy Rangers.

Our mission: to dig waterholes for wildlife and the local community.

We arrived at the dry Ewaso Nyiro Riv...

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Meet Our New Sponsored Students

Mar 19, 2015 | Categories: Education | Leave A Comment »

Mellarny

This year we are providing scholarships to two additional students, Mellarny and France. Under the Ewaso Lions scholarship, school tuition is covered for four full academic years.

Mellarny Mayo grew up in a poor single parent family with her mother and two brothers. The family do not have any livestock, but are instead dependent on the mother earning from little businesses in their small home town.

Mellarny started her primary school education in Ngare Mara in the year 2006 under difficult circumstances; her family did not have enough money for books or a proper school uniform.

Mellarny has great potential and concentrates very hard on her education. However, Mellarny was totally demoralized when her mother was diagnosed as H...

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New Paper Published by Ewaso Lions’ Alayne Oriol Cotterill

Mar 12, 2015 | Categories: Research, Staff | Leave A Comment »

Dr. Alayne Cotterill, Ewaso Lions Research Director and author of the new paper, tracks lions equipped with VHF collars in Laikipia, Kenya.

We are pleased to announce that Alayne – our Research Director – has a published article on lion spatial use in human dominated landscapes. The article appears in the peer-reviewed journal Animal Behaviour.

This work uses GPS technology so see how lions change their movements and activities around people. The results show that where human and livestock densities are relatively low, lions are able to use human occupied areas by adjusting their activities temporally to avoid being detected by people. That is, lions are more likely to be active near people when people are most likely to be asleep. When people are active, lions move away or hide. In this way, lions are able to use resources in human-occupied areas without being detected....

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